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1
Howdy,
I started out with the Tracker IV and loved it. I didn't have any issues with the build though like most detectors the battery covers are a pain :D . I think I posted a document in the BH section of the forum before Clegy took over . Will see if it is still there and if not re-post. . I also had a 3300 until it got stolen and that also was a good little detector. With the Tracker once you learn where on the discrim certain coins etc are you can be quite accurate about what you dig.
Roger

Found it http://forum.kimbucktwo.com/index.php?topic=11384.0

Thanks roger! Very informative reading. Will re-read when Tracker arrives, due early September.

Am I right in assuming rechargeables are too low in voltage to use on the Tracker?
2
Garrett / Re: For A T X Users.
« Last post by ivanll on Today at 11:54 AM »
Apparently the first post in a thread can't be modified, them be the rules  ???  which make no sense.

Not to worry, another picture is posted to take the place from the one which was located at "photo bucket"

ivanll
3
Welcome to the forum Tassie

       Looks like some good advice there from some fellow Taswegians ...!

     Thanks Ravvin & Tasrog
4
Howdy,
I started out with the Tracker IV and loved it. I didn't have any issues with the build though like most detectors the battery covers are a pain :D . I think I posted a document in the BH section of the forum before Clegy took over . Will see if it is still there and if not re-post. . I also had a 3300 until it got stolen and that also was a good little detector. With the Tracker once you learn where on the discrim certain coins etc are you can be quite accurate about what you dig.
Roger

Found it http://forum.kimbucktwo.com/index.php?topic=11384.0
5
Ha, no, not me.
I'm up at Wesley Vale and have only been out locally a few times since I got back into detecting.
I've mainly been detecting along local beaches, as the digging is easy and I don't have to worry about unsightly holes, while I learn how to use my new detector. I have a few really old house sites and 2 school sites to check out when I get some free time, but it's been hectic recently.

If you aren't in a huge rush, keep an eye on the For Sale area of the forum as people occasionally upgrade and move their old detectors on.

Greg.
6
Hi.
I started with a Bounty Hunter Quick-Draw II, and never had any issues with ground balance on normal soils.
Saying that though, I did have some weird things happen on a local beach. I'd get a signal, but it was really erratic. It would give me a low tone left to right, and a mid or high tone if I turned 90 degrees. When I dug down, I would find a thin layer of black sand. Not sure what it was, and I only ever found small hand sized pockets of it, but it was the only odd thing that used to detect like that.

The Bounty Hunter range seem like decent entry level machines. I bought mine around 6 or 7 years ago, so things may have changed, but I wouldn't class them as having a high build quality. You have to be very careful when changing batteries, or you can easily break the wires. Also, I found I had to disconnect both 9v batteries when I wasn't going to use it for a day or two or they would go flat and even leak. Luckily I had the detector stored upright so the stuff that leaked ran out, not into the guts of the box.

My Quick-Draw II was really poorly balanced. They aren't really heavy, but if you have any sort of shoulder issues, you will feel it after an hour or two of swinging one of these. While my current detector is a lot heavier, it is far better balanced and I can use it for most of the day without any problem, and I have a lot of shoulder and upper back issues.

Still, its been a few years since I bought mine and they may have changed/improved. You really need to decide how serious you are about getting into detecting, and what you can afford to outlay right at the start. The Bounty Hunter machines definitely pick up the buried targets, as I pulled several bucket loads of rusted iron and junk out of my yard when I first got it.

The thing is though, do you really need to use discrimination? In effect, all you are doing is filtering out some signals.
As much as I'd like to believe they have calibrated them for Australian coins, I can't see how it would be possible. They may have made a new face plate that shows Aus coins instead of the one with nickels and dimes that mine has, but that is still a rough guide. If you read the display and it says it is a ring-pull and you decide not to dig it, you could actually be missing out on a shilling or other coin. There is a lot of overlap. If you have a chance, look up the list posted in the Minelab CTX 3030 section that lists a lot of signal numbers and what they were found to be. You will see a lot of places where similar numbers were found to be very different things.

As to tuning for Australian ground conditions, I also don't see this as being likely. We have such a huge range of soil types, ages and conditions across the country that there is no way one setting could handle them all. I am pretty sure that the Bounty Hunter detectors have a built in auto ground balance anyway. Been a while since I read the book.

As an entry level machine, the price is ok. I'd buy one of these before touching one of the eBay specials. If you do go ahead and order one, I suggest you also get a spare coil cover. They are only a few dollars and stop you scuffing and chipping your coil. Just remember to take it off and clean it out occasionally. I also suggest you get yourself a good pin-pointer. They really make it a lot easier. I can't recommend one brand or model over another yet, as I am in the process of deciding on a new one for myself. I got the Vibra-Probe when I bought my Bounty Hunter and it was ok, but without the sound and with it having such a big sensing tip, it is hard to get really close.

As for other gear, you can get a lot of different trowels and small spades at places like Bunnings that will do the job until you decide whether you want to get more involved with detecting. I bought a couple of trowels, all under $10 each, and am learning to cut neat plugs so it doesn't look like a mad rabbit has been building a block of units in the parks. Some day I may look at the specialised tools like the Leche tool, but at $150+, I'd really want to be sure I was going to be doing a lot of detecting.

Not sure where you are in the state, but if you're anywhere along the NW coast, let me know and I'll bring my Quick-Draw over so you can have a play and see what you think. If you are in other parts of the state, I'm sure there are others down here who are closer and would be happy to meet up for a bit of a play.

Greg.

Thank you Greg for taking the time to provide such a comprehensive response. My early years were spent on the north west, just out of Sheffield, now live in Hobart. In fact, the prompt to get my interest rekindled in obtaining a MD was that I was visiting Devils Gate dam a few months back and saw a guy swinging his MD around the picnic area there. Wasn't you was it?
7
I see the info on this site.
http://www.treasureenterprises.com/metal%20detectors/metal%20detectors%20&%20accessories/bounty_hunter.htm
A few members have started with the BH units but most have upgraded. Someone will be able to comment on your question.
Welcome to the forum tassie.

Thank you for the welcome!
8
Hi.
I started with a Bounty Hunter Quick-Draw II, and never had any issues with ground balance on normal soils.
Saying that though, I did have some weird things happen on a local beach. I'd get a signal, but it was really erratic. It would give me a low tone left to right, and a mid or high tone if I turned 90 degrees. When I dug down, I would find a thin layer of black sand. Not sure what it was, and I only ever found small hand sized pockets of it, but it was the only odd thing that used to detect like that.

The Bounty Hunter range seem like decent entry level machines. I bought mine around 6 or 7 years ago, so things may have changed, but I wouldn't class them as having a high build quality. You have to be very careful when changing batteries, or you can easily break the wires. Also, I found I had to disconnect both 9v batteries when I wasn't going to use it for a day or two or they would go flat and even leak. Luckily I had the detector stored upright so the stuff that leaked ran out, not into the guts of the box.

My Quick-Draw II was really poorly balanced. They aren't really heavy, but if you have any sort of shoulder issues, you will feel it after an hour or two of swinging one of these. While my current detector is a lot heavier, it is far better balanced and I can use it for most of the day without any problem, and I have a lot of shoulder and upper back issues.

Still, its been a few years since I bought mine and they may have changed/improved. You really need to decide how serious you are about getting into detecting, and what you can afford to outlay right at the start. The Bounty Hunter machines definitely pick up the buried targets, as I pulled several bucket loads of rusted iron and junk out of my yard when I first got it.

The thing is though, do you really need to use discrimination? In effect, all you are doing is filtering out some signals.
As much as I'd like to believe they have calibrated them for Australian coins, I can't see how it would be possible. They may have made a new face plate that shows Aus coins instead of the one with nickels and dimes that mine has, but that is still a rough guide. If you read the display and it says it is a ring-pull and you decide not to dig it, you could actually be missing out on a shilling or other coin. There is a lot of overlap. If you have a chance, look up the list posted in the Minelab CTX 3030 section that lists a lot of signal numbers and what they were found to be. You will see a lot of places where similar numbers were found to be very different things.

As to tuning for Australian ground conditions, I also don't see this as being likely. We have such a huge range of soil types, ages and conditions across the country that there is no way one setting could handle them all. I am pretty sure that the Bounty Hunter detectors have a built in auto ground balance anyway. Been a while since I read the book.

As an entry level machine, the price is ok. I'd buy one of these before touching one of the eBay specials. If you do go ahead and order one, I suggest you also get a spare coil cover. They are only a few dollars and stop you scuffing and chipping your coil. Just remember to take it off and clean it out occasionally. I also suggest you get yourself a good pin-pointer. They really make it a lot easier. I can't recommend one brand or model over another yet, as I am in the process of deciding on a new one for myself. I got the Vibra-Probe when I bought my Bounty Hunter and it was ok, but without the sound and with it having such a big sensing tip, it is hard to get really close.

As for other gear, you can get a lot of different trowels and small spades at places like Bunnings that will do the job until you decide whether you want to get more involved with detecting. I bought a couple of trowels, all under $10 each, and am learning to cut neat plugs so it doesn't look like a mad rabbit has been building a block of units in the parks. Some day I may look at the specialised tools like the Leche tool, but at $150+, I'd really want to be sure I was going to be doing a lot of detecting.

Not sure where you are in the state, but if you're anywhere along the NW coast, let me know and I'll bring my Quick-Draw over so you can have a play and see what you think. If you are in other parts of the state, I'm sure there are others down here who are closer and would be happy to meet up for a bit of a play.

Greg.
9
I see the info on this site.
http://www.treasureenterprises.com/metal%20detectors/metal%20detectors%20&%20accessories/bounty_hunter.htm
A few members have started with the BH units but most have upgraded. Someone will be able to comment on your question.
Welcome to the forum tassie.
10
General Detecting Chatter / Re: A couple of nice firsts . . . .
« Last post by brianincnb on Yesterday at 11:04 AM »
both top finds!, with junk, I sort my out , the copper and brass. when the tub gets full, off to scrap metal merchants
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